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School Support

As experienced professionals in mainstream and special education we are able to offer all school staff from governors, headteachers, class teachers, teaching assistants as well as welfare/office staff, training and support to help them understand and work with children with autism spectrum condition (ASC). Our remit is to support mainstream schools to meet the needs of children with ASC.

 

Every child with autism spectrum condition is different, for us this is the challenge and reward of working with these children, but we understand that sometimes as a school or professional you may need help regarding strategies and approaches. This could be indepth and involve us observing a child in your class, working closely with yourself to model strategies (Tier 1 intervention), or maybe you just need a second opninion or to run an idea by someone who is more experienced in the field of ASC (school consultation). For more indepth information please see our Tiered Model of working for Autism Spectrum Condition.

 

Along with the Tiered model of working we also offer bespoke training sessions. These are just some of our popular sessions but we are happy to tailor make any training session to meet the needs of your school/ around the needs of an individucal child. Training can be in the form of a twilight session/series of sessions through to whole INSET days. For mainstream schools within St. Helens Borough Council there is no charge for our services.

 

We do ask, in order to help us prioritise work and develop a good working relationship with your school, that you invite us along to your termly multiagency planning meetings to discuss any new referrals and review any existing cases.

 

A big part of our work is transition support for children transitioning form primary to secondary school (Year 6-7).

 A guide to teaching a child with ASC  

 Sensory issues and school

 ASC "A young person's view"

 Useful tools to help a child/young person understand their autism